Rap mogul Sean Combs yesterday (June 28) denied a report in Talk magazine that alleges he's the subject of three criminal investigations. "For the record, it's not true, none of it is. All of it absol

Rap mogul Sean Combs yesterday (June 28) denied a report in Talk magazine that alleges he's the subject of three criminal investigations. "For the record, it's not true, none of it is. All of it absolutely not true, 100 percent," Combs told the Associated Press in an interview, adding: "This has to stop, fact-check all your stuff and don't throw things out there that you know would possibly have speculations or affect a person."

"We stand by the facts of the story," Talk publicist Lisa Dallos said.

Combs, 31, was acquitted in March of weapons and bribery charges stemming from a 1999 shooting in a New York nightclub. However, Talk magazine reports in its August issue that his legal woes are far from over.

It said the Internal Revenue Service office in New York was investigating Combs for possible tax violations, Las Vegas police were looking into an allegation of gun possession, and Atlanta authorities were probing Combs and a bodyguard in connection with the slaying of a gang member who had been hired to protect Marion "Suge" Knight.

A nemesis of Combs' and head of Death Row Records, Knight has been imprisoned since 1997 for violating parole on assault charges and is due to be released in August.

In addition, Talk said Los Angeles authorities believe Combs may have information that could lead them to the killer of his friend Christopher Wallace, aka Biggie Smalls or the Notorious B.I.G. The rapper was killed in Los Angeles in 1997. The magazine cited unnamed sources.

Las Vegas police spokesman Christopher Darcy said he knew of no investigation into Combs, while Los Angeles police spokesman John Pasquariello said police interviewed Combs about two years ago, "early in the investigation" of the unsolved Wallace killing, and have no plans to do so again. "We've talked to him. He gave us information," Pasquariello said.

Phone calls to the Atlanta authorities and the IRS went unreturned. Combs said he called the IRS himself to see if he was being investigated. "They're telling me, 'No, I ain't got no investigation on you.' So I'm like, how can somebody do something like this? It's just so silly and stupid, it's not even worth an in-depth comment on it."

Combs, CEO and founder of Bad Boy Entertainment, said the article "is definitely hurtful and it's upsetting, and it's, like, disgusting." The rap mogul, who also has his own clothing line, said Talk ran the piece to boost its sales.


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