Courtney Love Wins Round In Cobain Song Fight

A King County (Wash.) Superior Court judge earlier in June granted Kurt Cobain's widow, Courtney Love, an injunction against the release of a song recorded by Cobain with Nirvana before his death in 1

A King County (Wash.) Superior Court judge earlier in June granted Kurt Cobain's widow, Courtney Love, an injunction against the release of a song recorded by Cobain with Nirvana before his death in 1994. Love and the band's two surviving members, Dave Grohl and Krist Novoselic, are facing off in court over control of a studio recording of the song, a 45-track box set, and ultimately, the legacy of the group itself.

"The fight is over control of Nirvana," said Warren Rheaume, the attorney for Grohl and Novoselic, who want to release the song as part of the box set that would commemorate the 10th anniversary of the band's album "Nevermind." Love says the song is not necessary for the box set's success. A trial is set for Dec. 31, 2002.

The song was performed at several concerts in late 1993 and by Love's band, Hole, two years later. It has been known by various names, including "On the Mountain" and "You've Got No Right." On the box set, intended for release Oct. 23, it's called "You Know You're Right."

"It's a spectacular piece of music," said O. Yale Lewis, Love's attorney. "Probably one of the most important pieces of music to be released in years." It also could be lucrative. Rheaume called the box set a "tremendously valuable asset."

James Barber, Love's manager, contends in court documents that an album that includes "You Know You're Right" could sell up to 15 million copies worldwide, more than "Nevermind." Without the song, he said, sales may be one-fifth that number.

According to court papers, Love is trying to dissolve Nirvana L.L.C., the corporation formed by the partnership between the two sides. The court papers state that Love said she was "emotionally overwrought and distraught" when she signed the agreement, which requires that any proceeds from the corporation's assets be split equally among the three.


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