John's Angry Letter To Paul Up For Auction

An expletive-filled, handwritten letter drafted by John Lennon to Paul McCartney and his wife, Linda, after the Beatles' 1970 breakup is to be sold at auction. The six-page draft -- expected to fetch

An expletive-filled, handwritten letter drafted by John Lennon to Paul McCartney and his wife, Linda, after the Beatles' 1970 breakup is to be sold at auction. The six-page draft -- expected to fetch up to $112,000 when it goes under the hammer at Christie's in London on Oct. 4 -- captures the bitterness between Lennon and the McCartneys during and immediately after the Fab Four's demise, and Lennon's anger at the treatment of Yoko Ono.

"I hope you realize what (expletive) you and the rest of my kind and unselfish friends laid on Yoko & me since we have been together -- It might have sometimes been a bit more subtle or should I say 'middle class' -- but not often," Lennon wrote, according to excerpts released by Christie's.

The undated letter has been put up for auction by an undisclosed seller. It was apparently written in the aftermath of the band's April 1970 breakup. It also appears to be a response to a letter sent to Lennon by Linda McCartney in which she apparently castigated him for remarks he made to the press about Paul and the other Beatles, the auction house said.

"Obviously if they keep asking Beatle questions -- I'll answer them," Lennon wrote. "I know some of it gets personal -- but whether you believe it or not -- I try and answer straight ... I don't resent your husband -- I'm sorry for him."

It is unclear if a final version of the letter was ever sent to the McCartneys, according to Christie's. One Beatles historian called it a snapshot of a period when the business side of the band was in chaos, exacerbating the tensions that caused the breakup.

The letter, which historians have written about, also provides a first-person account of Lennon's decision to leave the Beatles. Disgusted by their mega-band status and feeling trapped by fame, Lennon wrote that he told Paul McCartney he was quitting, which was met with pleas to "just let it (peter) out" and to "keep quiet about" the breakup.

"I'm not ashamed of the Beatles, but some of the (expletive) we took to make them so big," he wrote. "Do you really believe that most of today's art came about because of the Beatles? -- I don't believe you're that insane Paul -- do you believe that? ... Didn't we always say we were part of the movement -- not all of it? Of course we changed the world -- but try and follow through -- get off your gold disc and fly!"


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