Originally signed on the weight of a four-track demo sent to Matador Records, producer Elisabeth Esselink (aka Solex) celebrates her third full-length with the label by perfecting a musical technique

Originally signed on the weight of a four-track demo sent to Matador Records, producer Elisabeth Esselink (aka Solex) celebrates her third full-length with the label by perfecting a musical technique she's employed all along: She utilizes samples taken from the hard-to-sell second-hand CDs in her Amsterdam-based shop (C&D), fusing them with her own bootleg recordings and sweetly petulant vocals (which sound eerily American), along with some TV snippets, for a seamless pop aesthetic. What distinguishes her from other cut-and-paste pastiche artists is that it is almost impossible to tell that she is using samples rather than her own original instrumentation. And though she's created a seemingly loungey, lo-fi indie rock record that would be the envy of such bands as Luscious Jackson, she's quick to represent her roots in such songs as "Honey (Amsterdam Is Not L.A.)."—TP