A Rolling Stones 40th anniversary tour is looking increasingly like a go for 2002, although it is unlikely there will be any sort of firm announcement before the spring. If indeed the Stones do tour f

A Rolling Stones 40th anniversary tour is looking increasingly like a go for 2002, although it is unlikely there will be any sort of firm announcement before the spring. If indeed the Stones do tour for the first time since 1999, it would be no surprise if their longtime tour producer, Michael Cohl, would be in on the action.

Cohl, whose Toronto-based concert promotion firm The Next Adventure was acquired by Clear Channel Entertainment (then SFX) in 1999, would not comment on any specifics regarding a Stones tour, but did tell Billboard, "I love the Rolling Stones. Every year I propose they should tour, and this year is no different."

The legendary rockers are a touring industry unto themselves. In the 1990s, the band grossed some $750 million, selling out 307 of 333 mostly stadium shows, far more than any other act for the decade. In nearly two years of touring in 1997-99, which included their first arena-level dates in 20 years, the Stones grossed $337.2 million and played to a total 5.6 million people.

Although Stones frontman Mick Jagger will release a new solo album, "Goddess in the Doorway," on Nov. 20 via Virgin, it remains unclear whether the Stones would be touring behind a new studio set of their own. The group's last album, "Bridges to Babylon," debuted at No. 3 on The Billboard 200 in October 1997 and has sold more than 1.1 million copies in the U.S. to date, according to SoundScan.

In the meantime, Jagger will be the subject of an hour-long ABC special, "Being Mick," which will air Nov. 22, according to his spokesperson. The show features behind-the-scenes footage of Jagger collaborating with U2's Bono, the Who's Pete Townshend, Wyclef Jean, and Lenny Kravitz on the new album, plus the artist on the set of his new film "Enigma" and on holiday in the French Riviera, among other exotic locales.