In the last room at Alice Cooper's haunted house, where a chainsaw-wielding maniac chases screaming customers onto the street, there's a "wall of shame." A cell phone, beeper, glasses, and some jewelr

In the last room at Alice Cooper's haunted house, where a chainsaw-wielding maniac chases screaming customers onto the street, there's a "wall of shame." A cell phone, beeper, glasses, and some jewelry dangle on rusty hooks. For the actors portraying the haunted house's freaks and ghouls, it's evidence of a good night's scare: personal items left behind by customers too frightened to stop.

Cooper, the makeup-wearing pioneer of shock rock, is on tour this Halloween promoting his new Spitfire album, "Dragon Town." But Alice Cooper's Nightmare, the haunted house the 53-year-old left behind in his hometown of Phoenix, is so frightening, "People pay us their money and then thank us for scaring them," haunted house director Steve Kopelman said.

About 1,000 people show up nightly for the show, which runs through Saturday (Nov. 3). Children under 13 must be accompanied by an adult. Admission is $13.

The production cost $250,000 and took 15 months to finish, said director Ted Kelley. High-tech robots, sound and lighting fill the house, but Kelley said its success stems mostly from the 30 actors and crew.

"It's like an eight-hour aerobics class for the actors," said Kelley. "Granted, it's a 30-second show that they'll do hundreds of times a night, but it's in their blood. They love to scare."


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