A trio of December concerts featuring the likes of Elton John, Sting, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Third Eye Blind, and Jaguares, will be staged to benefit Los Angeles' Hollywood-Sunset Free Clinic. The

A trio of December concerts featuring the likes of Elton John, Sting, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Third Eye Blind, and Jaguares, will be staged to benefit Los Angeles' Hollywood-Sunset Free Clinic. The Dec. 13 and 14 Silver Lining Silver Lake shows will be staged the Paramour estate in L.A.'s Silver Lake area, while the Dec. 15 event will be held at the Hollywood Palladium.

Hosted by Robert Downey Jr. and Christina Ricci, the Dec. 13 show will boast performances by Elton John, Sting, Daniel Lanois, Deborah Falconer, and Bostich (the Nortec Collective). The Dec. 14 show will be hosted by Johnny Knoxville, Tony Hawk, Kelly Slater, Ione Skye, and Adam Carolla, and will feature performances by the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Jaguares, Aimee Mann, Jurassic 5, DJ Keoki, and Norton Wisdom.

Third Eye Blind will headline the Dec. 15 Hollywood Palladium show, which will be hosted by Benicio Del Toro, Roselyn Sanchez, and Lucy Liu. Also performing will be Jaguares and Becky.

Tickets to the Dec. 13 and 14 shows run from $250 to $1,000, and are already on sale via Ticketmaster. Tickets to the final show range from $100 to $150, and will go on sale Saturday (Nov. 17). For more information, visit the official Silver Lining Silver Lake Web site.

Last year's inaugural Silver Lining Silver Lake benefit -- featuring Beck, Mann, the Dust Brothers, and Rufus Wainwright, as well as an art auction -- raised more than $488,000 for the clinic. The event was hosted by Downey, Ricci, Skye, and Minnie Driver, and drew more than 1,600 to the Paramour estate. Among those who attended were the Chili Peppers' Anthony Kiedis, Sonic Youth's Kim Gordon, the Beastie Boys' Mike Diamond, actors Gina Gershon and Rosanna Arquette, and "The Simpsons" creator Matt Groening.

Founded in 1968, the Hollywood-Sunset Free Clinic provided primary medical and mental health care to more than 85,000 patients last year, most of which live below the poverty level. The organization receives only minimal public funding, and is supported by a group of volunteers.

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