Lollapalooza Returning After 5-Year Layoff

Jane's Addiction leader Perry Farrell is planning to return Lollapalooza to the summer festival circuit in 2002, according to a representative from the William Morris Agency, which co-owns the tour. W

Jane's Addiction leader Perry Farrell is planning to return Lollapalooza to the summer festival circuit in 2002, according to a representative from the William Morris Agency, which co-owns the tour. While no artists have been announced, or even approached, this will mark the first Lollapalooza since 1997, when Tool, Korn, and Snoop Dogg headlined the expedition.

The agency spokesperson says a more detailed announcement is scheduled to be made this week, but declined to comment on what sort of information will be revealed. Representatives for Farrell could not be reached for comment.

Lollapalooza began in 1991 and brought the idea of a rock caravan tour back into the mainstream. Offering tickets that were usually in the $25 price range, Lollapalooza lumped together big name and up-and-coming artists -- Metallica, Beck, Butthole Surfers, Pearl Jam, Ice Cube, Smashing Pumpkins, Mercury Rev, Tricky, the Breeders, Orbital, and Nine Inch Nails all played the tour.

The brainchild of Farrell, Lollapalooza spawned a slew of imitators, ranging from Lilith Fair to the H.O.R.D.E. and Family Values tours. The treks that have continued to thrive are those that target a niche market, like the heavy metal-leaning Ozzfest, or punk-and-skate-themed Warped tour. Major multi-genre tours have generally gone by the wayside, replaced largely by radio station festivals.

"The Lollapalooza concept was simple," the tour's former producer Stuart Ross told Billboard. "We offered a good value for the money. We had several headline acts on our main stage, as well as lesser-known acts, and we had cutting-edge bands on our second stages. We also had several different areas of alternative entertainment, including art, film, a poetry slam, dancers. It changed every year, but Lolla was always a full day of entertainment for a reasonable price."

Last summer, Moby followed the Lollapalooza formula to launch the Area:One tour, featuring such diverse acts as the Roots, Nelly Furtado, New Order, and Incubus. While it was generally a critical success, the festival was far from a sell-out.

Despite Lollapalooza's absence, Farrell never lost the urge to stage mass outings. In 1997, he organized the day-long, dance-flavored ENIT tour, which was cancelled after one date. In October 2000, he unveiled initial plans for a multi-day music festival in the Israeli desert, which was tipped for the spring of 2001 but was never staged.