Rapper Master P (real name: Percy Miller) has been forced to sell an unfinished recording studio to settle unpaid construction bills and other debts. The rap mogul announced plans for the $10 million

Rapper Master P (real name: Percy Miller) has been forced to sell an unfinished recording studio to settle unpaid construction bills and other debts. The rap mogul announced plans for the $10 million Baton Rouge, La., studio in 1997. Contracting disputes slowed construction and the studio is now a shell, with unfinished walls and a chain-link fence warning of guard dogs.

The East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff's Office is scheduled to auction the property tomorrow (Feb. 20).

Miller's lawyers appeared in court last week to try to halt the auction, but State District Judge Tim Kelley refused to annul a $190,165 default judgment granted to Charles Carter Construction, the project's general contractor. The judgment was granted in July for construction work, materials, and equipment used to build the studio.

James Holliday, Miller's lawyer, has asked to meet with the judge today, said John Andrishok, a lawyer for the construction company. Holliday didn't return calls for comment.

Master P, originally from New Orleans, has faced numerous financial and legal setbacks since he began moving operations of his No Limit Records company to Baton Rouge in 1997.

The wealthy community where Miller bought a home filed a $14,000 lawsuit against him over unpaid dues and penalties. Miller entered into a $739,108 consent judgment with Bank One in May after the bank sued him for allegedly falling behind on payments on a $1 million promissory note. Miller and his wife, Sonya, put the house in his mother's name two years ago, and the bank accused him of trying to place the property out of creditors' reach.

The state Department of Revenue filed a lien against Miller and his wife in 2000 for $1,434,371 in unpaid income taxes. The lien is in the process of being released, said Danny Brown, a department spokesman.

Miller is working with the Nickelodeon cable network to develop a television show for his 12-year-old son, rapper Lil' Romeo.


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