As noted in this two-disc set's booklet, three of BMI's top 100 songs of the century—"Never My Love," "Cherish," and "Windy"—belong to the Association, which is surpassed on the list onl

As noted in this two-disc set's booklet, three of BMI's top 100 songs of the century—"Never My Love," "Cherish," and "Windy"—belong to the Association, which is surpassed on the list only by the Beatles and Simon & Garfunkel. But these monster hits showed only one dimension of the pre-eminent '60s Los Angeles "sunshine pop" group, which emerged out of the same folk-rock scene that spawned the Byrds and the Mamas & the Papas. After covering Joan Baez's "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You" and Bob Dylan's "One Too Many Mornings," the group had its breakthrough hit in 1966 with "Along Comes Mary." Later hits included the ethereal Eastern-inflected "Pandora's Golden Heebie Jeebies," the breezy "Windy," and the 1969 movie theme "Goodbye, Columbus." Indeed, the remainder of the set shows that while the Association's delicately tasteful group vocals and musicianship epitomize the banal term "easy-listening," their songs are full of lasting substance.—JB