Dallas' psychobilly patriarch Reverend Horton Heat (aka Jim Heath) can outplay anyone with a guitar this side of Dick Dale.

Dallas' psychobilly patriarch Reverend Horton Heat (aka Jim Heath) can outplay anyone with a guitar this side of Dick Dale. Together with slap-bassist Jimbo Wallace and drummer Scott Churilla, the Reverend kicks up a rowdy racket on Lucky 7. Songs deal with familiar themes (women, booze, and cars, not necessarily in that order) while playfully merging elements of surf, rockabilly, and punk. The smoking "Galaxie 500," a humorous break-up song, starts in low gear before Heat puts the pedal down and rocks full throttle. "Tiny Voice of Reason" swings softly and shows the band's gentle side to be just as rewarding. Aside from a couple of tepid joke songs tacked on at the end, Lucky 7 marks a return to form for one of rock's under-appreciated bad boys.—JDF