A district judge in Clarkston, Mich., has refused to disqualify himself in the case against shock rocker Marilyn Manson (real name: Brian Warner). Oakland County assistant prosecutor Kenneth Frazee as

A district judge in Clarkston, Mich., has refused to disqualify himself in the case against shock rocker Marilyn Manson (real name: Brian Warner). Oakland County assistant prosecutor Kenneth Frazee asked Gerald McNally to recuse himself because the judge had indicated he likely would fine Manson $4,000 in the case. Frazee contended the judge proposed the punishment without hearing all of the facts.

Defense attorney Walter Piszczatowski said Frazee had produced no evidence of personal bias on McNally's part. McNally said that his knowledge of some facts in the case did not warrant his removal, The Oakland Press reported.

Manson was charged with fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct and assault and battery following allegations he assaulted a security guard at a July concert. Manson is accused of gyrating against the neck and head of the guard during the concert at Clarkston's DTE Energy Theater.

In December, McNally reduced the criminal sexual conduct charge to disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor punishable by up to 90 days in jail. Manson pleaded not guilty to both charges last September. His next court date is April 25.

As reported last week, Manson has chosen "The Golden Age of Grotesque" as the title for his group's fifth studio album. The set, which Manson describes as his "most genius deluge of hardcore guitar-drum violence mixed with '30s cabaret decadence," is expected for a fall release, according to an Interscope spokesperson.


AP LogoCopyright 2002 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.