On her sophomore set, Boston's Eileen Rose does not reinvent the singer/ songwriter genre.

On her sophomore set, Boston's Eileen Rose does not reinvent the singer/ songwriter genre. Instead, she mixes it up a bit, blending witchy, undulating vocals reminiscent of Kate Bush with the more organic Americana and blues sounds. On the CD's title track, Rose showcases her greatest musical asset—a rich, dusky voice—as she sing-speaks, murmurs, and waxes philosophical over her own eerie guitar strum and a bleating synth. Juxtaposing this skeletal, haunted sound are songs like "Good Man," a down-home folk-rocker about the travails of livin' with a lyin' man. Rose and company also cut loose on several tunes, including the '50s-style rocker "Snake" (featuring a duet with Rose and guitarist Kris Dollimore). There's much to dig into here, though the album does have a couple clinkers, including "See How I Need You," with the kind of morose, woe-is-me lyrics that give female singer/songwriters a bad rap.—KIT