Bush guitarist Nigel Pulsford, who had been on leave from the U.K. rock outfit he co-founded with frontman Gavin Rossdale in 1992, appears to be leaving the band for good. Former Helmet guitarist Chri

Bush guitarist Nigel Pulsford, who had been on leave from the U.K. rock outfit he co-founded with frontman Gavin Rossdale in 1992, appears to be leaving the band for good. Former Helmet guitarist Chris Traynor, who had been subbing for Pulsford since last year as he awaited the February birth of his son, looks set to permanently fill the post. "We have had no arguments, no falling out, no loss of respect -- just perhaps a common goal," Rossdale writes on Bush's official Web site.

"It was everything to have Nigel in the band," he continues. "He brought me so much, he brought us all so much. What a superb guitar player. I will always be deeply connected and grateful to him."

In the somewhat rambling journal entry, Rossdale later admits, "there is a pain in my neck. Life creeps up my back and hangs heavy like mass. The only way out is through and that means the best record Bush can make. We will make it with Chris. He has done so much for us out here. Nigel could not tour -- imagine if we had to wait for ages finding the right guy etc. Chris actually slipped in real easy and he's so easy going. It's always been no problem. It's crazy really. For me he's great live and a really good understanding generous guitar player. And a sweetheart."

Rossdale may have been making subtle references to the disappointing sales for the band's latest studio album, "Golden State." Released last year under a new deal with Atlantic, the set debuted at No. 22 on The Billboard 200 but has sold just 239,000 copies in the U.S. to date, according to Nielsen Soundscan. Bush's previous album, 1999's "The Science of Things," has sold 957,000 units.

"Let me tell you as far as I'm concerned, I'm pissed with how things are," Rossdale writes. "I was unsure of future moves for ages but the fact is that I refuse to back down from Bush and everything we have accomplished over the years. It feels too soon. I gotta write another record and if I go out it will be done in style, not a whimper but a bang. I mean what's the f***ing point. I make music to believe in. To change myself or to learn something. Maybe a challenge. Maybe I know nothing but I hate the way music has changed. I hate the way everyone has sold out. It's like Big Brother is the DJ."

Bush will soldier on in the coming months at a handful of European festival dates. Visit the band's Web site for the latest itinerary.