Laura Nyro's immortality is re-affirmed by Columbia/Legacy's initial three entries—replete with bonus material—in an expanded and remastered Columbia/Nyro catalog reissue schedule.

LAURA NYRO
Eli and the Thirteenth Confession
REISSUE PRODUCER: Al Quaglieri
ORIGINAL PRODUCER: Charlie Calello
Columbia/Legacy Ck 85763

New York Tendaberry
REISSUE PRODUCER: Al Quaglieri
ORIGINAL PRODUCER: Laura Nyro, Roy Halee
Columbia/Legacy Ck 85764


LAURA NYRO AND LABELLE
REISSUE PRODUCER: Al Quaglieri
ORIGINAL PRODUCER: Kenny Gamble, Leon Huff
Columbia/Legacy Ck 85762




Laura Nyro's immortality is re-affirmed by Columbia/Legacy's initial three entries—replete with bonus material—in an expanded and remastered Columbia/Nyro catalog reissue schedule. First up is the landmark Eli and the Thirteenth Confession from 1968, which followed her hit-filled 1966 Verve/Forcast debut, More Than a New Discovery. Produced by Four Seasons arranger Charlie Calello, it, too, yielded smash pop hit covers (the 5th Dimension's "Stoned Soul Picnic" and Three Dog Night's "Eli's Comin' "). But it also heralded the artist's direction into a less structured, jazzy terrain ("Poverty Train" featuring Joe Farrell's flute, "Lonely Women" with Zoot Sims' sax) and an earthy feminism ("The Confession"). Also noteworthy is one of her most intimate and beloved songs, "Emmie." Taking an even more experimental turn on her 1969 follow-up, New York Tendaberry, Nyro collaborated with Simon & Garfunkel engineer Roy Halee, who lent open space and a production sparkle to songs that reflected both her unconditional love of her town (especially the album's title track) and the intensity of the times ("Save the Country," another 5th Dimension hit). Barbra Streisand also charted with the upbeat album track "Time and Love," which later became the apt title to both a posthumously released Nyro tribute album and a best-of disc. Taking a break from such spectacular originality, Nyro teamed with the pre-"Lady Marmalade" LaBelle in 1971 for Gonna Take a Miracle, an unparalleled celebration of girl-group singing within the context of her seminal soul/R&B influences. Highlights of the joyous/ anguished all-cover session—heightened by LaBelle's acrobatic harmonies and superbly produced by Philly soul maestros Gamble & Huff—include a sexually charged version of "You've Really Got a Hold on Me," a desperate reading of "Nowhere to Run," a touching "Spanish Harlem," a rousing "Jimmy Mack," and a most gorgeous "It's Gonna Take a Miracle."—JB