A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has thrown out Courtney Love's challenge to a California labor code as part of her lawsuit against Universal Music Group and Geffen Records. Judge Fumiko Wasserman y

A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has thrown out Courtney Love's challenge to a California labor code as part of her lawsuit against Universal Music Group and Geffen Records. Judge Fumiko Wasserman yesterday (May 30) overturned an earlier U.S. Court of Appeals ruling that California's "seven-year" statute -- which Love claimed is unfair because it binds recording artists to contracts longer than those of other workers -- be included in the suit.

Wasserman let stand four of Love's original 15 complaints, including breaches of contract, good faith, fraud, and fiduciary duty. The trial is scheduled to begin June 11.

A Universal Music Group spokesperson says the case has been whittled down to a "garden variety" contractual dispute that "pales" in comparison to a separate suit filed by the company against Love's recently disbanded group Hole for undelivered albums. Love's lawyer A. Barry Cappello could not be reached but in a statement says Universal "tried everything it could to get this case thrown out, but it failed."

The seven-year statute is at the core of an ongoing debate between labels and artists. Sen. Kevin Murray (D-Culver City) is seeking legislation that would strike the amendment, meaning artists who exit a label after seven years could no longer be sued for damages for undelivered albums. Murray did not return calls by deadline.

As previously reported, Love announced last week that she would no longer record or tour with Hole. She remains embroiled in a legal battle over the Nirvana catalog with her late husband Kurt Cobain's former bandmates, Dave Grohl and Krist Novoselic.

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

Print