Fifteen years after his death, master classical guitarist Andres Segovia finally was brought back to his hometown as he wished. Segovia's remains were exhumed from the Madrid cemetery where he origina

Fifteen years after his death, master classical guitarist Andres Segovia finally was brought back to his hometown as he wished. Segovia's remains were exhumed from the Madrid cemetery where he originally was buried and brought to Linares in Jaen province, the heart of Spain's olive-growing region.

Segovia, widely considered the greatest classical guitarist of the 20th century, died in 1987 at the age of 94. He is credited with elevating the guitar from a lowly bar instrument to one played on classical concert stages around the world, garnering as much respect as the violin or piano. He once said one of the goals of his musical career was "to separate the guitar from mindless, folklore-type entertainment."

Segovia's widow, Emilia, avoided moving his body to Linares, even though it was his wish, until a proper resting place was prepared, town hall officials said. A 16th-century palace has been refurbished to house the musician's remains and a museum dedicated to his life and work.

A wake was scheduled for last night (June 3) with a burial today. Emilia de Segovia led the funeral cortege that left Madrid yesterday. Awaiting in Linares was 32-year-old Carlos Segovia, the only survivor among Segovia's four children.

The Segovia museum will feature sheet music written by Segovia, suits he wore while performing, medals he won, and a favorite guitar nicknamed "La Nina," or little girl.


AP LogoCopyright 2002 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

Print