No charges will be filed against the organizers of the June 2000 outdoor rock festival in Copenhagen that resulted in the deaths of nine young men two years ago, a state prosecutor said after the conc

No charges will be filed against the organizers of the June 2000 outdoor rock festival in Copenhagen that resulted in the deaths of nine young men two years ago, a state prosecutor said after the conclusion of a second inquiry. Last year, the Danish government ordered the inquiry into why the organizers of the multi-artist Roskilde festival didn't stop a set by Pearl Jam on June 30, 2000, when they realized the crowd of up to 50,000 people was being pressed against the stage. In addition to the fatalities, 43 people were injured.

The investigation also was to establish who had the authority to stop the concert at Roskilde, 25 miles west of Copenhagen. An initial report published in December 2000 concluded that "a chain of unfortunate circumstances" led to the deaths after poor sound in the back prompted fans to surge forward.

"No charges will be filed against any people in this case," state prosecutor Erik Merlung said in a statement yesterday (June 11). "There is no reason to presume that something punishable has been done." However, the prosecutor noted that the festival organizers had no clear policy on stopping a show or communicating with large crowds about accidents. The festival management said it would review the results of the investigation "to find ways to make further security improvements."

The report was to be included in a government brochure that will be sent to organizers of all large outdoor events, police districts, and emergency services.

The Roskilde rock festival, one of Europe's oldest, first was held in 1971 and was inspired by the 1969 Woodstock festival in upstate New York.


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