Sixpence None The Richer will release its first album in four years, "Divine Discontent," Oct. 29 via Reprise/Word. It's the Grammy-nominated act's follow-up to its 1998 self-titled debut (Squint), wh

Sixpence None The Richer will release its first album in four years, "Divine Discontent," Oct. 29 via Reprise/Word. It's the Grammy-nominated act's follow-up to its 1998 self-titled debut (Squint), which reached No. 1 on Billboard's Heatseekers and Top Contemporary Christian charts and has sold 688,000 copies to date, according to Nielsen SoundScan. The set was powered by the single "Kiss Me," which hit No. 1 on Billboard's Top 40 Mainstream chart and No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100.

So what took so long? For starters, the Nashville-based sextet was thrown into recording limbo as its original Squint deal got tangled in the label's financial problems and subsequent sale. The band landed on Reprise via the $84.1 million sale of Squint parent Word Entertainment to Warner Music Group last fall by Gaylord Entertainment.

"I was scared we weren't going to be able to put out a record again," singer Leigh Nash tells Billboard for the Aug. 17, 2002 issue. "It was depressing and kind of painful not knowing what was going to happen. The fear of the unknown really got ahold of me."

Nash is trying to look on the bright side of being away for so long. "I don't know if I would have wanted to be in the scene the last few years; it was so [teen]-pop-driven," she offers. "I don't know if there was room for us," she says, before adding, "I don't know if there's room for us now. But maybe the break will help people not get sick of us anymore, if they got tired of hearing 'Kiss Me.'"

The group is expected to tour this fall in support of "Divine Discontent," which will be preceded by the midtempo first single "Breathe Your Name."