"Worship and Tribute," the innovative sophomore release by New York post-hardcore outfit Glassjaw, almost went unrecorded. Mired in business disputes with its former label, Roadrunner Records, the gro

"Worship and Tribute," the innovative sophomore release by New York post-hardcore outfit Glassjaw, almost went unrecorded. Mired in business disputes with its former label, Roadrunner Records, the group nearly disbanded last year.

Instead, Glassjaw literally saved by longtime supporter and producer Ross Robinson. "We were going to break up because of how much we hated [being on] Roadrunner. But we decided to write the record just in case. Luckily Ross, our boy, bought us out and we signed with Warner Bros.," explains Glassjaw's vocally acrobatic singer Daryl Palumbo. "He's the reason for all of this. He's a member of the band. He's one of my best friends. He's a father figure to a lesser extent. He's everything to me."

"Worship and Tribute" is a natural evolution from the group's debut, "Everything You Wanted To Know About Silence." The set features some elements favored by such progressive metal acts as Deftones but adds to it a melodic blend of hardcore guitars and punishing rhythms reminiscent of fellow New York bands such as Quicksand.

Fans came out of the woodwork when Glassjaw finally picked up its instruments to tour this year. Many shows sold out and a recent stop in South Florida was so packed the group had to play a second show to accommodate the hundreds of fans stuck outside. "Nobody cared 10 minutes ago, and all of a sudden we did that Juliana Theory tour -- our record was pretty much out on the Internet at that point -- and heads were just going crazy knowing all the words," Palumbo says.

The band graduated from packing clubs this spring to being featured on both the Vans Warped Tour and Ozzfest this summer. "I never know how they're going to react to us," Palumbo observes. "I know we have kids that appreciate our music that are from both camps and I know it's not often that can happen. I'm glad that our band can take advantage of that."

When the summer festivals end the group will go back to headlining club tours with support from such acts as Haste, Christiansen, and Boy Sets Fire. "I'll never tour with a joke band because I'm doing well enough that I can pick who we play with and that's the most amazing part of this," Palumbo says.

Besides label headaches, Palumbo has to deal with a much more painful physical ailment: Crohn's disease, which affects the digestive system. Along with other touring singers like Beth Orton and Saves The Day's Chris Conley, Palumbo never knows when the disease's symptoms could flare up. "I'm just praying I don't get sick," he says. "I take a lot of medicine but I just pray I don't get hurt."

But despite the past turmoil, Palumbo and the band have a positive outlook on their current status. "I couldn't be happier right now with the progress we've made and we're doing it all on our terms," he says. "That's the bottom line."