Much of the current '80s musical revival is steeped in irony, but New York's Interpol professes a genuine love for the gloomier side of British post-punk and new wave.

Much of the current '80s musical revival is steeped in irony, but New York's Interpol professes a genuine love for the gloomier side of British post-punk and new wave. Turn on the Bright Lights, Interpol's full-length debut, borrows liberally from bands like Joy Division and Echo and the Bunnymen but still manages to create its own musical identity. Right from the start, the band cultivates a moody ambiance, with an economic structuring of shimmering guitars, bass, and drums on "Untitled." From there, the band embarks on a journey ranging from the slow, sad waltz of "NYC" to the epic grandeur of "Stella Was a Diver and She Was Always Down." Singer Paul Bank's lyrics explore the seedier side of city life while his deadpan delivery calls to mind Ian Curtis. Employing layered guitars, probing bass lines, and the occasional synthesizer swoon, Interpol creates an homage to their particular vision of the '80s that stands proudly alongside the best of its idols.—JDF

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