A new independent film is shining the spotlight on Washington, D.C.'s go-go music movement via interviews and live footage from the scene's past and present, including go-go legend Chuck Brown, the Ba

A new independent film is shining the spotlight on Washington, D.C.'s go-go music movement via interviews and live footage from the scene's past and present, including go-go legend Chuck Brown, the Backyard Band, Little Benny, Experience Unlimited, and the Uncalled 4 Band. "The Pocket," produced, written, and directed by Michael Cahill and Nicholas Shumaker, also sports interviews with Fugazi's Ian MacKaye, poet Thomas Sayers-Ellis, and writer Norman Kelley.

The film recently had its first screening at D.C.'s historic Lincoln Theatre. It will follow the film festival circuit and be marketed to U.S. and foreign TV networks in the coming months. In a fitting portrayal of a movement that blurred racial lines with its relentless, party-driven rhythms, "The Pocket" offers a vista that traverses a thriving local economy, one that has unpredictably persisted amidst the strengthening restrictions of a consolidated global music industry.

Negotiations for a soundtrack are currently under way. "This is a movie that had to be made," notes Marlon Creaton, manager of San Francisco's Record Kitchen. "It's time for the kids who spend money on Ashanti and Murder Inc. records to know about a different form of African-American-rooted music. We're waiting on a soundtrack from this movie. The timing couldn't be better for it. It could -- and should be -- absolutely huge."

"The Pocket" follows in the footsteps of the 1986 film "Good to Go," produced by then-Island Records president Chris Blackwell. The movie featured such go-go mainstays as Brown, Trouble Funk, and EU.