The mother of Icelandic pop queen Bjork is in the midst of a hunger strike in a bid to persuade the world's largest aluminum producer to pull out of a project in the Icelandic highlands. Hildur Runa H

The mother of Icelandic pop queen Bjork is in the midst of a hunger strike in a bid to persuade the world's largest aluminum producer to pull out of a project in the Icelandic highlands. Hildur Runa Hauksdottir, who helped Bjork produce her first record at age 11, said she's gotten a lot of public support. "I'm more optimistic now than I was at the start of the hunger strike," she said. "People are pledging their support and for me that gives me a lot of strength.

"I don't believe that Alcoa or the Icelandic government should underestimate the will of the Icelandic people," she added.

Environmentalists say the smelter and accompanying power plant will ruin the wilderness area above Vatnajokull, Europe's largest glacier, in east Iceland. "I hope my action will help preserve Iceland's most beautiful areas for future generations," Hauksdottir said Wednesday, the 10th day of her strike.

Wade Hughes, a member of Alcoa's Iceland project team, said the plan would change a "relatively small" part of the wilderness area. Since ceasing to eat, Hauksdottir, who is trained in homeopathy, has survived on tea made from Icelandic thyme and yarrow. "I haven't decided how far to go," she said. "It might take another week."


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