The mother of pop singer Bjork has ended a hunger strike against a plan to develop the Icelandic highlands. Hildur Runa Hauksdottir said yesterday (Oct. 29) that she began eating again on Sunday eveni

The mother of pop singer Bjork has ended a hunger strike against a plan to develop the Icelandic highlands. Hildur Runa Hauksdottir said yesterday (Oct. 29) that she began eating again on Sunday evening. She began her fast Oct. 7 to try to persuade Pittsburgh-based Alcoa Inc. to pull out of the plan to build an aluminum smelter and hydroelectric plant in the wilderness area. Environmentalists say the $3 billion project will ruin the area above Vatnajokull glacier.

The state-owned power company plans to build 11 dams to create a 22-square-mile reservoir, which will provide the hydroelectric power for the smelter at Reydarfjordur on the coast. Alcoa spokesman Wade Hughes has said the firm was committed to sustainable industrial development and had a good track record on conservation.

Hauksdottir, 56, said she quit because she was satisfied that her message was having a global impact. "Americans, Europeans, people in the Far East, have all contacted me asking how they can help, how they can stop this," Hauksdottir said. "I thank them for their support and I urge them to keep track by reading the campaign Web site. But a lot more work needs to be done -- time is running out."

Hauksdottir lost more than 14 pounds during her protest, surviving on Icelandic herbal tea and homeopathic tonics. Bjork arrived in Iceland Sunday -- the 36-year-old singer's first visit since she gave birth to her daughter earlier this month.


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