Eminem, clad in a black sweatshirt with "Detroit" splashed on the front in white letters, was walking so fast he might as well have been running.

Eminem, clad in a black sweatshirt with "Detroit" splashed on the front in white letters, was walking so fast he might as well have been running. He breezed past the screaming crowd and throngs of local media, but didn't say a word. He didn't have to. The night was his. The local kid who conquered the world of popular music with catchy songs and clever lyrics brought Hollywood home to Detroit.

The feature film "8 Mile," starring Eminem, had its Detroit premiere last night (Nov. 7) at the Phoenix Theatres on, appropriately, 8 Mile Road. It is scheduled to open nationwide tonight.

"I'm happy to see Eminem doing his thing on the big screen," said Obie Trice, who has rapped on Eminem records and appears on the film's soundtrack, which debuted this week at No. 1 on The Billboard 200. "Motown is finally coming back. It's not an R&B thing but a hip-hop thing."

Trice has a small part in "8 Mile," one of a handful of major movies shot entirely in Detroit. "I'm in this movie, but if you get some popcorn you'll miss me," he said.

Mark Bass, who has produced Eminem's music since the rapper's teenage years, worked with the 30-year-old Grammy winner on soundtrack cut "Lose Yourself," which is No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100. "This is a dream come true for us," Bass said of himself and his brother, also a longtime Eminem associate. "Working with Eminem is a joy. Lyrically, he's a genius. We've watched him become a superstar. We're proud like big brothers."


AP LogoCopyright 2002 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

Print