Fred Bronson reports on the latest accomplishments by Eminem, Tori Amos, and Nirvana.

'MILE' MARKER: The soundtrack to Curtis Hanson's film "8 Mile" debuts at No. 1 on The Billboard 200. The Shady/Interscope release is the second soundtrack to top the chart in 2002; "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" spent two weeks in pole position in March. While "8 Mile" is listed on the chart as a soundtrack album, it features the film's star, Eminem, who also has the No. 1 song on the Billboard Hot 100, as "Lose Yourself" maintains for a second week. Eminem should complete his hat trick of No. 1s this weekend, when "8 Mile" becomes the No. 1 film at the box office.

"8 Mile" is the 22nd album to advance to No. 1 in 2002. It should be the third album in a row to only spend one week on top, following Faith Hill's "Cry" and Santana's "Shaman." "8 Mile" is expected to give way next week to the first solo album by 'N Sync star Justin Timberlake.

By debuting at No. 1, "8 Mile" is the first soundtrack to begin its chart life at the summit since "Howard Stern Private Parts" did so the week of March 15, 1997.

'WALK' AWAY: Tori Amos' label debut for Epic proves to be one of her strongest entries on The Billboard 200 as "Scarlet's Walk" enters at No. 7. Of her eight chart entries, "Walk" is her fourth-highest peak position. Here's a summary of Amos' chart career on the Billboard album tally, in chronological order:

"Little Earthquakes," No. 54 (1992)
"Under the Pink," No. 12 (1994)
"Boys for Pele," No. 2 (1996)
"Hey Jupiter" EP, No. 94 (1996)
"From the Choirgirl Hotel," No. 5 (1998)
"To Venus and Back," No. 12 (1999)
"Strange Little Girls," No. 4 (2001)
"Scarlet's Walk," No. 7 (2002)

THE SEVENTH: Nirvana has its first album to chart in the 21st century. The eponymous new release on DGC/Geffen/Interscope enters The Billboard 200 at No. 3. It's the first Nirvana album to chart since "From the Muddy Banks of the Wishkah" spent one week at No. 1 in 1996. The first Nirvana album debuted 11 years ago: "Nevermind" entered the chart the week of Oct. 12, 1991.