News on Bruce Springsteen, Faith No More, Ui

Groove ArmadaBruce Springsteen & the E Street Band have added a handful of winter U.S. concert dates to precede trips to Australia and Europe. The Boss and his crew now have seven stateside shows planned, including a March 7 show in Atlantic City, N.J.

Tickets for most of the shows are already on sale. The Atlantic City show and a March 4 stop in Jacksonville, Fla., will go on sale Saturday (Jan. 11) at 10 a.m. via Ticketmaster. A March 2 show in Austin, Texas -- a make-up date for a Nov. 6 concert that was canceled due to eye surgery needed by saxophonist Clarence Clemons -- is sold-out.

Springsteen is among eight performers leading the field with five Grammy nominations. His latest Columbia album, "The Rising," is nominated for album of the year and best rock album, while it's title track is up for song of the year, best rock song, and best male rock vocal performance. Released in late July, "The Rising" debuted at No. 1 on The Billboard 200. Currently No. 84 in its 23rd week on the chart, the set has sold 1.8 million copies in the U.S., according to Nielsen SoundScan.

Here are Springsteen's upcoming U.S. tour dates:

Feb. 28: Duluth, Ga. (The Arena at Gwinnett Center)
March 2: Austin, Texas (Frank Erwin Center)
March 4: Jacksonville, Fla. (Jacksonville Coliseum)
March 6: Richmond, Va. (Richmond Coliseum)
March 7: Atlantic City, N.J. (Boardwalk Hall)
March 10: Providence, R.I. (Dunkin Donuts Center)
March 11: Rochester, N.Y. (Blue Cross Arena)


-- Barry A. Jeckell, N.Y.







Groove ArmadaRhino Records has set a Jan. 28 release date for "This Is It: The Best of Faith No More," a single-disc collection featuring 19 career-spanning cuts from the influential metal/funk/fusion band, which broke up in 1998. The compilation will feature many of Faith No More's best-known songs, including their breakthrough hit "Epic," "We Care a Lot," "Falling to Pieces," "Midlife Crisis," and "A Small Victory."

Also included on the set are early tracks "Arabian Disco" and "Introduce Yourself," both recorded before vocalist Mike Patton joined the band in 1988, as well as rarities such as "Anne's Song," "The Cowboy Song," a live version of "As the Worm Turns," and "The Perfect Crime," which appeared on the soundtrack to "Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey."

Patton told Billboard.com in August that there may be additional unreleased tracks in the vaults, but that he's in no rush to make them available. "If it is up to me, no," he said. "But it ain't up to me, so maybe. If I believed in them I would have put them out long ago. There are reasons that bands and musicians make demos and outtakes -- because they are not good enough to make the record. A lot of people forget that."

Faith No More released six albums in its 16-year career. Its biggest successes were 1989's "The Real Thing" (Slash/Reprise), which peaked at No. 11 on The Billboard 200 and 1992's "Angel Dust," which debuted at No. 10 on The Billboard 200 and has sold 640,000 copies in the U.S., according to Nielsen SoundScan.


-- Troy Carpenter, N.Y.







Groove ArmadaNew York instrumental rock combo Ui has wrapped work on "Answers," its first studio album in nearly five years. No release date has yet been nailed down for the 13-track, 45-minute album, which will be issued by Southern. It's the follow-up to 1998's acclaimed "Lifelike" and Ui's first release of any kind since 1999's "The Iron Apple" EP.

Group leader Sasha Frere-Jones tells Billboard.com that Ui has expanded to a quartet with the addition of Erik Sanko (Skeleton Key, Lounge Lizards). He reports that "'Answers' is very energetic and you will hear more guitar than before (some songs have two guitars). I think you can dance to all but two songs."

Ui has no plans to play live or tour at present, owing to the busy personal and professional lives of its members. "I have two sons and a full career as a writer," Frere-Jones says. "[Drummer] Clem [Waldmann] has a baby daughter and is a member of the Blue Man Group. [Bassist] Wilbo [Wright] is a music teacher and tree farmer. Erik is just plain busy. Do the math and you end up with a scheduling nightmare. The delays also help the editing process. If a song sounds good after two years, it must be OK."


-- Jonathan Cohen, N.Y.

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