A famed Indian composer has won a court order barring sales of a hip-hop hit he claims borrowed heavily and without credit from one of his songs in an act of "cultural imperialism."

A famed Indian composer has won a court order barring sales of a hip-hop hit he claims borrowed heavily and without credit from one of his songs in an act of "cultural imperialism." A federal judge in Los Angeles on Monday issued an order prohibiting further sales of the song "Addictive" by Truth Hurts unless and until composer Bappi Lahiri is listed on the song's credits, Anthony Kornarens, an attorney for Lahiri, said. The cut is found on Truth Hurts' album "Truthfully Speaking."

"The judge took the matter quite seriously and felt as though, from what I could tell, the defendants had not acted appropriately," Kornarens said.

Lahiri first filed in October against hip hop producer Dr. Dre (real name: Andre Young), Aftermath Records, Aftermath parent Interscope Records, and Universal Music Group. A spokesman for Universal Music referred calls to Interscope. An Interscope spokeswoman was not immediately available for comment. Dr. Dre's attorney, Howard King, was also not immediately available to comment.

Lahiri claims that the producers of "Addictive" lifted four minutes of the original recording of the song "Thoda Resham Lagta Hai." "Truthfully Speaking" has sold 324,000 copies in the U.S. since its release last June, according to Nielsen SoundScan. "Addictive," produced by DJ Quik, was released as a single and reached No. 2 on Billboard's Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks chart and No. 9 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Kornarens, who accused the record label of "cultural imperialism," said the judge set an expedited trial date of June 17 for Lahiri's suit. He added that Universal's attorneys indicated to the court they would consider an appeal of the injunction.


COPYRIGHT: (c) Reuters 2002. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Reuters content, including by caching, framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Reuters. Reuters and the Reuters sphere logo are registered trademarks and trademarks of the Reuters group of companies around the world.

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

Print