To stay on the leading edge of a genre requires energy, aggression, and iconoclasm.

To stay on the leading edge of a genre requires energy, aggression, and iconoclasm. Mexico City rap-metal quartet Molotov succeeds on all three counts with Dance and Dense Denso, its first album in four years. Politically shy these guys are not. But while their bilingual lyrics are full of social commentary, they're largely devoid of the preachiness and sloganeering that trip up lesser groups. With wounded idealism, they rap about official corruption, petty lawlessness, and bureaucratic inertia on the minor-key, midtempo "Hit Me (Gimme tha Power)." Swinging from sotto voce on "Hit Me" to a scream on "Nostradamus Mucho," Molotov keeps the pace varied with different tempos, themes, and vocal styles. With outspoken and explicit lyrics, Molotov is not everyone's cup of tea. But on the set's lead single—the polka-rock-hued "Frijolero," with lyrics attacking the U.S. over Iraq and immigration—Molotov certainly has its fingers on the pulse of Mexico. The song's stance mirrors polls that show most Mexicans oppose a war with Iraq and favor open immigration to the U.S.—RB

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

Print