Michael Jackson's children's foundation is now in jeopardy because it neglected to file any of the required financial disclosure forms in the state of New York, where it is based.

Michael Jackson's children's foundation is now in jeopardy because it neglected to file any of the required financial disclosure forms in the state of New York, where it is based. Created in January 2001 by the self-proclaimed King of Pop "to break the cycle of neglect," the Heal The Kids organization failed to report any of its basic spending, fund raising, activities and pay roll as required under New York state law, said Paul Larrabee, spokesman for state Attorney General Eliot Spitzer.

In a February letter, Spitzer's office notified the Jackson charity that it failed to comply with the law aimed at protecting those who donate to a charity and those who are supposed to benefit from it. "That report would have been due in 2002," Larrabee said. "They have been given 30 days to comply and at that time penalties begin to accrue if they fail to comply."

Fines would be $10 a day up to $1,000. No phone number was available for the charity at its New York office and there was no immediate response to an E-mail sent through the charity's Web site.

The site, apparently not updated since 2001, states: "The aim of Heal The Kids is to educate adults on the importance of reprioritizing their lives in order to bring children into the main focus in order to imbue them with the love and devotion which they so badly need and to break the cycle of neglect."

The charity's goals included developing "a campaign that will help parents and adults around the world make their children their most important priority ... help at-risk children receive more consideration and support from all sectors of society."

Among the specific programs were to be one in which "key hotel chains" and phone companies would provide free calls for parents to contact their children while away on business, discounted children's books, and discounted Internet service.

As previously reported, Jackson plans a two-hour Feb. 20 special on Fox to respond to a recent British-made documentary that drew huge ratings in the U.S. Jackson was angry at how he was depicted in the documentary, which showed him as an eccentric man-child who says he sometimes innocently lets children sleep in his own bed, but with no sexual contact.


AP LogoCopyright 2002 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

Print