Former Rage Against The Machine frontman Zack de la Rocha and mixmaster DJ Shadow have added their voices of protest against the U.S. led war against Iraq in a new song, "March of Death." The cut was

Former Rage Against The Machine frontman Zack de la Rocha and mixmaster DJ Shadow have added their voices of protest against the U.S. led war against Iraq in a new song, "March of Death." The cut was made available this morning (March 21) for free download on de la Rocha's Web site and is expected to appear on his long in-the-works Epic solo debut, due sometime this year, according to a spokesperson.

Over a more aggressive backing track than is usually associated with DJ Shadow, de la Rocha rails against U.S. President George W. Bush's decision to attempt to remove Iraqi president Saddam Hussein by force: "Here it comes, the sound of terror from above / he flew his Texas twisted tongue / the poor lined up to kill in desert slums / for oil that burn beneath the desert sun."

"Lies, sanctions, and cruise missiles have never created a free and just society," de la Rocha said in a statement. "Only everyday people can do that, which is why I'm joining the millions worldwide who have stood up to oppose the Bush administration's attempt to expand the U.S. empire at the expense of human rights at home and abroad. In this spirit, I'm releasing this song for anyone who is willing to listen. I hope it not only makes us think, but also inspires us to act and raise our voices."

Shadow added, "As an American, my government's actions give me cause for great concern. I'm proud to support Zack de la Rocha in giving a musical voice to that concern." According to Shadow's official Web site, "March of Death" is one of three songs he has produced for de la Rocha's solo album, the rest of which is being helmed by Nine Inch Nails frontman Trent Reznor.

"March of Death" comes on the heels of the online release of anti-war songs by such acts as the Beastie Boys and John Mellencamp. De la Rocha has long been an outspoken advocate for peace and leftist politics; Rage Against The Machine appeared at the 1999 Tibetan Freedom Festival and even appeared naked onstage to a wail of feedback instead of playing a set at the Philadelphia stop on Lollapalooza, in protest of the Parents Musical Resource Council's efforts to place warning labels on CDs.