The big screen musical "Chicago" was the big winner last night (March 23), taking six Oscars home from the 75th annual Academy Awards ceremony in Los Angeles, including best picture. Among the Miramax

The big screen musical "Chicago" was the big winner last night (March 23), taking six Oscars home from the 75th annual Academy Awards ceremony in Los Angeles, including best picture. Among the Miramax film's honors was a best supporting actress trophy for the eight-months pregnant Catherine Zeta-Jones, who also performed the "Chicago" song "I Move On" with fellow cast member and nominee Queen Latifah.

"Chicago," which was nominated for 13 awards, also won for art direction, costumes, sound, and editing during the ceremony, which was hosted by actor/comedian Steve Martin and broadcast live on ABC.

Rapper Eminem, the only musical artist not present to perform a nominated work, won the best song award along with Jeff Bass and Luis Resto for "Lose Yourself," from the film "8 Mile." Resto was on hand to receive the honor from presenter Barbra Streisand, and said of Eminem, "He's creative. He has symphonies in his head... He's a good man. He has a good heart."

Along with the "Chicago" number, the show's musical other performances consisted of U2 ("The Hands That Built America" from "Gangs of New York"), Paul Simon ("Father and Daughter" from "The Wild Thornberrys Movie"), and Caetano Veloso and Lila Downs ("Burn It Blue" from "Frida"). The Oscar for best score went to Elliot Goldenthal's work on "Frida."

The ceremony was widely acknowledged as a break from coverage of the U.S. led war with Iraq, even though ABC News provided updates twice during the broadcast. It was also a platform for several participants to express their feelings about the conflict. The first came from best supporting actor winner Chris Cooper ("Adaptation") who simply wished for peace, as did best actress honoree Nicole Kidman ("The Hours").

The most passionate messages were delivered by an emotional best actor winner Adrien Brody ("The Pianist") and winning documentary filmmaker Michael Moore ("Bowling for Columbine"). Brody said making the Holocaust-era film taught him of the horrors of war and its effects on individuals, while Moore pointed a finger at what he called the U.S.'s "fictitious president" and said, "Shame on you Mr. Bush," to a mixed chorus of jeers and applause.

Even Frank Pierson, president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, took time out from his comments to send a message to the people of Iraq, saying, "Let's have peace soon and let you live without war." Martin ended the show with the message, "To our young men and women overseas, we are thinking of you."

For the full list of winners, visit oscar.com.