The song choice for the first "American Idol" charity single has been changed to a pair of cover versions of Lee Greenwood's "I'm Proud To Be an American" and "God Bless the U.S.A." Performed by the s

The song choice for the first "American Idol" charity single has been changed to a pair of cover versions of Lee Greenwood's "I'm Proud To Be an American" and "God Bless the U.S.A." Performed by the show's second season finalists, the double-A side single will be released April 15 or April 22 via RCA Records. As previously reported, the single was originally going to be a remake of the Burt Bacharach-penned "What the World Needs Now Is Love."

The contestants sang the Greenwood songs during the March 26 "Idol" episode. "They got such an overwhelming, positive response from viewers for doing those songs that we decided to release them as the 'American Idol' charity single," RCA executive VP/GM Richard Sanders tells Bilboard.com.

The "American Idol" competition continues tonight (April 1), but without disqualified contestant Corey Clark, who was booted from the show because of a prior arrest for assault. "American Idol" officials did not confirm or deny if Clark would appear on the charity single, but sources say that because of his dismissal from the show, it is highly unlikely that he will be involved in any future "American Idol"-related projects. At deadline, reps for the show said that it was undecided if Clark would be replaced.

In other news, Fox is gearing up for a younger-skewing version of the hit reality show/talent contest. According to the series' official Web site, the network will begin a series of auditions for "Junior Idol" later this month.

"Do you have what it takes to become America's Junior Idol?" a section of the idolonfox.com site asks. Auditions for talented youngsters aged 6-13 will be held April 19 in Chicago, April 26 in New York, and May 3 in Atlanta. Information regarding a Los Angeles audition is due to be announced on tonight's (April 1) episode of "American Idol." A planned airdate for the series has not been announced.

"Junior Idol" looks to capitalize on the "American Idol" brand while targeting a demographic similar to NBC's "Most Talented Kid" competition, which premiered last week. That Friday night series has contestants competing in three different age groups (3-7, 8-12, 13-15), each judged for talent and showmanship. Each week, a finalist in each group will be chosen to ultimately compete in a final round for a cash prize.