Few rock acts enjoy as mythic a reputation as the

Few rock acts enjoy as mythic a reputation as the Clash. And when just about every soul lucky enough to see the group live remarks, "They were the best band I ever saw, no one before or after ever com

Few rock acts enjoy as mythic a reputation as the Clash. And when just about every soul lucky enough to see the group live remarks, "They were the best band I ever saw, no one before or after ever compared," it gets pretty easy to understand why. Essential gives those of us who missed 'em a taste of what it was like, interspersing live clips with formal videos. None is more goosebump-inducing than "Clampdown," which shows the band as they are generally remembered—the three frontmen drenched in sweat, sneering, and completely captivating. Perhaps more priceless is the slew of footage from the act's famously oversold stand at long-gone Times Square venue Bond's, as well as early interview snippets. Yet, what is of most note to the Clash's core faithful is the inclusion of frontman Joe Strummer's short film, Hell W10, a silent film shot in black and white and recently set to Clash music. Recalling The Harder They Come, it features bassist Paul Simonon as a broke, aspiring musician at odds with a West London mob boss played by guitarist Mick Jones. All the cool and corny videos are also here. But, once again, the live clips remind us that these guys had it all: the look, the moves, the songs, and the heart.—WO