Chilean rock band La Ley's long-awaited studio set, which follows the success of its MTV Unplugged album, showcases a harder-edged band, one that highlights urgent messages with crunching guitars.

Chilean rock band La Ley's long-awaited studio set, which follows the success of its MTV Unplugged album, showcases a harder-edged band, one that highlights urgent messages with crunching guitars. Although the songs here remain highly melodic, they are leaps beyond the pop/rock umbrella that has long defined La Ley's mellower approach to rock. This is true even of slower tracks like "Y Los Demás" (punctuated by gorgeous vocal harmonies) and "Mi Ley," the most memorable track here—and a good showpiece for singer Beto Cueva's wide-ranging voice. Cuevas uses Libertad to discuss such topics as liberty and justice, but the balance between preachy and persuasive is often lost, notably in the single "Amate y Salvate" and the rambling "Esa Es la Verad."—LC