Kiss co-frontman Paul Stanley is working on his first solo album in 25 years, the artist reveals to Billboard.com. Stanley says he's working with a crop of songwriters that includes Andreas Carlsson,

Kiss co-frontman Paul Stanley is working on his first solo album in 25 years, the artist reveals to Billboard.com. As previously reported, Kiss vocalist/bassist Gene Simmons is also working on a solo project. Stanley says he's working with a crop of songwriters that includes Andreas Carlsson, who has written songs with or for the likes of Celine Dion, Bon Jovi, Backstreet Boys, LeAnn Rimes, Britney Spears and 'N Sync.

"He's a great writer, and, actually, a big Kiss fan," Stanley says, adding that he'll start really focusing on the project after Kiss' upcoming co-headlining tour with Aerosmith. "It's in the process of being shaped."

Fans shouldn't expect any unused Kiss relics to surface on the project, which should be issued next year. "I'm a big believer that, if a song doesn't make it on an album, there's a reason," Stanley says, "and to dig up something that's been sitting around for 10 or 15 years doesn't seem worth it, because at some point, sure, it can see the light of day, just by default. And that's not enough reason.

"I believe if something gets rejected time and time again, it probably doesn't belong on an album," he continues. "I also like to think that a song is like a fresh issue of a magazine or a newspaper. Ya know, the ink is still wet because it's current. Recycling old stuff, to me, is not of any interest, because as life goes on, there are new experiences to draw from."

Stanley and Simmons haven't issued solo sets since each original member of Kiss simultaneously released such a project in 1978. Simmons recently told Billboard.com his album will feature songs co-written by Bob Dylan and Frank Zappa. He's also courting the likes of Axl Rose, Phish's Trey Anastasio, and John Mellencamp for guest turns.

Stanley also offered new details about the Kiss/Aerosmith tour, which is expanding. It will start in amphitheaters and then move into arenas and will likely visit some major markets more than once.

"It looks like it's gonna keep extending, and rightfully so," Stanley says. "It's an exciting bill, and people, not only in America, but in Australia, Japan, and other countries, are very interested in it. It's a fun, exciting package that the people really didn't expect. It's going to be a great night of music, of arguably the two premier American rock bands of the last 25 years."

He says there's not much of a competition factor between the two acts. "We realize we could never be Aerosmith, and they realize they could never be Kiss," Stanley says. "The beauty is that both bands have thrived and survived for 30 years. So, with this revolving stage, and with both of us going out to give 110%, the fans win and we win. I can't think of a better way to spend an evening. Hopefully, [the tour] won't end until everybody says, 'Enough!'"