"Idol" Founder Reveals Future Plans

Despite the massive success of the Fox TV show "American Idol," creator Simon Fuller tells Billboard his "ambitions for the show have been realized." Fuller is looking ahead to several other music-bas

Despite the massive success of the Fox TV show "American Idol," creator Simon Fuller tells Billboard his "ambitions for the show have been realized." Fuller is looking ahead to several other music-based TV projects, including "World Idol," which he says will air before the end of the year.

Fuller aims to make "World Idol" the Olympics of the music business. Winners from different "Idol" shows from around the world will compete against each other for the "World Idol" title.

"We'll amortize the voting so that we assign points based on things like the size of country," he says. "To make it fair, people won't be allowed to vote for singers from their own country. That way, a large country like the U.S. won't necessarily skew the results in its favor."

Fuller says that the viewer voting for "World Idol" will be done by phone and the Internet. "The judges will be involved in voting," he adds. "So the final vote will be a combination of the judges' decisions and the results from different nations."

Fuller has two other new music shows in the works. "I Love Music" will be a weekly magazine-style show that is expected to debut next year on the U.K.'s ITV network. "It'll be a celebration of music," he says. "The themes might be the celebration of music by the charts, by the year, by artists, [or] by movies."

Fuller is also in discussions with ITV to put his new show, "Music for Britain," on the air next year.

The program will be a telethon that Fuller says was inspired by the U.K.'s successful Comic Relief and Children in Need telethons. "Music for Britain" will be artist-driven, with various charitable causes getting the spotlight. "We could have artists who want to raise money for the town they grew up in or any cause they choose," Fuller notes.

The mogul also hints that he is going to drop a bombshell on the music industry. It is an idea that he says he cannot openly talk about for now, but he promises that "it will be a revolution."

Fuller hints that the idea has to do with "making music much easier to get, in terms of listening, downloading, and purchasing. It's a simple idea that no one has really done before."

Until that idea comes to fruition, Fuller says he still has some challenges ahead of him, including getting the "Idol" TV show on-air in Japan. "We're in every major country, or have plans to be, except for Japan. It's our last big holdout."