Justin Timberlake has signed a multi-tiered sponsorship deal with McDonald's. The alliance is tied to the restaurant chain's new worldwide marketing campaign, which launches this month. Timberlake wil

Justin Timberlake has signed a multi-tiered sponsorship deal with McDonald's. The alliance is tied to the restaurant chain's new worldwide marketing campaign, which launches this month. Timberlake will sing on and appear in several new McDonald's "I'm Lovin' It" commercials, the first of which debuted yesterday in Germany and will begin airing Sept. 29 in the U.S. Additionally, McDonald's will sponsor the Jive artist's 35-city European solo tour, which starts in November.

The "I'm Lovin' It" hip-hop jingle was written by Mona Davis and produced by superstar duo the Neptunes and the Clipse, who also raps on the song.

Timberlake will be involved in activities to support the Ronald McDonald House Charities, World Children's Day at McDonald's and the chain's global sports sponsorships, including the FIFA World Cup and the Olympic Games.

Meanwhile, Timberlake's 'N Sync bandmate Lance Bass has been named youth spokesperson for World Space Week 2003. The Oct. 4-10 United Nations-founded event is marked by celebrations in more than 50 nations.

As part of his efforts, Bass will participate the worldwide competition "Lance's Lab," open to kindergarteners through 12th graders. Students will design a hypothetical International Space Station module for Bass to live and work in, and winners will have the opportunity to meet the artist at an awards ceremony in early 2004. For details, visit spaceweek.org.

"For decades, spaceflight has been the privilege of a select few," Bass says in a statement. "And while those pioneers explored new frontiers and inspired us with their amazing achievements, now is the time to open that horizon to everyone. By engaging students in the science and engineering of space flight, we're empowering a new generation with the skills needed to explore the frontiers of space and achieve their dreams."

Last year Bass had hoped to be a passenger on a Russian voyage to the International Space Station. Although his training was already underway, those plans were scuttled when his sponsors, who were planning to make a documentary of the mission, did not pay the $20 million cost by a required deadline.