In the film "Amadeus," the emperor chastises Mozart for using "too many notes." While we do not endorse that particular criticism, "Music for My Peoples" is guilty of too many things.

In the film "Amadeus," the emperor chastises Mozart for using "too many notes." While we do not endorse that particular criticism, "Music for My Peoples" is guilty of too many things. A pastiche of styles—reggaetón, salsa, bachata, dancehall, hip-hop, R&B—it has moments of beauty and swing, but a lot of the time, those moments are lost within the clutter. The excuse for being so musically inclusive may be Dunbar's gorgeous voice and versatility; an R&B acoustic version of "Jamás," for example, is soulful, and his blend of hip-hop and salsa work. Other times, he sounds self-conscious. The programming in "La Noche," a bachata, could be attributed to progressiveness, but "A Dónde Iré," a salsa track, inexplicably starts with a bandoneon that never returns. Dunbar is to be commended for striving to expand the scope of tropical music. He just needs to streamline the results.—LC

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