An inspection of a Honduran factory that produces a clothing line for rap music mogul Sean "P. Diddy" Combs did not uncover the kinds of labor abuses alleged by activists, the country's labor minister

An inspection of a Honduran factory that produces a clothing line for rap music mogul Sean "P. Diddy" Combs did not uncover the kinds of labor abuses alleged by activists, the country's labor minister said. Yesterday (Oct. 30), Labor Minister German Leitzelar led a group of inspectors on a six-hour visit of the Southeast Textiles factory in Choloma, 120 miles north of Tegucigalpa.

"I think things have been overblown," Leitzelar told reporters afterward. "If there are any irregularities, they are not like what was contained in the accusations.

"We visited the place to find out the truth," he said. "On Monday, we'll present a formal report on the situation."

The factory's owner and the head of Honduras' assembly plant industry have said that claims of sweatshop conditions there were false.

On Tuesday, U.S.-based workers rights group National Labor Committee director Charles Kernaghan issued a report alleging poor conditions at the factory. The report said workers are subjected to body searches, 11- to 12-hour daily shifts and mandatory pregnancy tests. It also said they were paid 24 cents for each $50 Sean John sweat shirt they sew.

Combs has promised to investigate the allegations.


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