Omara Portuondo, the 73-year-old Cuban chanteuse best-known for her appearances with the Buena Vista Social Club (and an unforgettable turn in Wim Wenders' film of the same name), steps out on her own

Omara Portuondo, the 73-year-old Cuban chanteuse best-known for her appearances with the Buena Vista Social Club (and an unforgettable turn in Wim Wenders' film of the same name), steps out on her own for a second time. As a younger performer, Portuondo infused her music with a Brazilian lilt; in "Flor de Amor," she pays subtle homage by pairing Cuban musicians with Brazilian players. Noteworthy tracks include the opening "Tabu," wherein congas and timbales frame African-focused lyrics; the lushly technicolored and thoroughly retro "Amor de Mis Amores"; and the sensual charanga "Mueve la Cintura Mulato." Portuondo's smoky voice imbues every word with deep feeling, and she performs with magnificent ease and enviable self-possession. Sometimes the textures run slightly too thick, and a cadre of sweet-toned female backup singers show up a bit too often. Overall, though, it's a charming album that proves this flower hasn't faded, despite the passing of time.—AT