Looking to build on the momentum established by their first album, "Up for Bracket," the Libertines keep the great vibes going with a more revealing, self-titled sophomore set.

Looking to build on the momentum established by their first album, "Up for Bracket," the Libertines keep the great vibes going with a more revealing, self-titled sophomore set. Often compared to such bands as the Strokes and the Vines, the Libertines made their album debut during the neo-garage movement two years ago and established themselves as one of the top rock acts in the United Kingdom. Since then, the band has fallen on rough times, with lead singer Peter Doherty dealing with a much-publicized drug addiction. With such issues splashed across tabloid headlines, the band hit the studio to record a highly personal album reflective of Doherty's struggles. The result is raw and emotional. "Can't Stand Me Now" revolves around the roller-coaster friendship between Doherty and guitarist Carl Barat; it is one of many high points here. Less anti-establishment and more reflective, "The Libertines" is a fine snapshot of a tumultuous period in the life of the band and the world around it.—RT