A New York judge has approved a class-action lawsuit against Ticketmaster and Madison Square Garden for allegedly selling seats with obstructed views for Michael Jackson's 30th anniversary concert thr

A New York judge has approved a class-action lawsuit against Ticketmaster and Madison Square Garden for allegedly selling seats with obstructed views for Michael Jackson's 30th anniversary concert three years ago.

The judge said the suit potentially covers 7,840 ticket buyers "who received no advance notice that their seats were inadequate for viewing purposes."

The suit filed by Dana Gross, 32, says she paid Ticketmaster $98.50 plus service charges for each of six tickets to see the self-styled King of Pop's concert in September 2001. She's asking for $14 million in damages.

Glen Rosenberg, 33, one of Gross' friends who went to the show, said after the lawsuit was filed, "We couldn't even see the show properly on the TV screens. It was so bad I might as well have been sitting in my bathroom."

Gross' lawyer, Peter Agulnick, said he had no comment on Judge Herman Cahn's ruling, which was made public yesterday (Oct. 6). No date was set for a trial.

Agulnick has said that his client wrote Ticketmaster to complain that her group had to sit behind a wall and could not see Jackson, Britney Spears, Liza Minnelli, Ray Charles or other performers. Agulnick said Ticketmaster wrote back and basically told Gross, "Tough luck."

The judge allowed the case to go forward on complaints that included deceptive business practices and breach of contract. He noted that a Garden executive conceded employees were aware of the obstructions days before the concert.

Spokespeople for Ticketmaster and Madison Square Garden said they would not comment on pending litigation.


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