Recalling that early-'80s moment when rock fans decided disco didn't suck after all, Interpol cherishes rhythm and guitars equally.

Recalling that early-'80s moment when rock fans decided disco didn't suck after all, Interpol cherishes rhythm and guitars equally. On its 2002 debut, "Turn On the Bright Lights," the quartet refreshed the contradictions of N.Y.C. precursors Television: clinically sinuous guitars, passionately chilly vocals. Follow-up "Antics" is even better, possibly because the band isn't trying so hard to be weird. This time, Interpol fixates on pop music's most elemental motive. "You make me want to pick up a guitar/ And celebrate the myriad ways that I love you," singer Paul Banks intones on lead single "Slow Hands." In "C'mere," he echoes every yearning love song ever written: "The trouble is/ That you're in love with someone else/ It should be me." After just 10 tracks, "Antics" is over, and the listener is left looking backward with longing.—JM