Best-known for the R&B hits "So Good, So Right" and "Piano in the Dark"—and for penning Oleta Adams' crossover anthem, "Get Here"—singer/songwriter Brenda Russell has never been cont

Best-known for the R&B hits "So Good, So Right" and "Piano in the Dark"—and for penning Oleta Adams' crossover anthem, "Get Here"—singer/songwriter Brenda Russell has never been content to stick to one genre. On her first album since the 2000 release "Paris Rain," Russell melds a cornucopia of influences, from R&B and jazz to rock, pop, classical and Latin. Whereas "Rain" was more moody, "Between the Sun and the Moon" reflects a freer, more rhythmic Russell. Along for the ride are such production/writing collaborators as Lee Ritenour, Patti Austin and Incognito's Jean-Paul "Bluey" Maunick. Easygoing opener "Make You Smile" does just that. From there, Russell downshifts to sultry ("When You Comin' Back to Me") and then folky (Smokey Robinson's "The Tracks of My Tears"). The best of the bunch is "It's a Jazz Day," a mellow salute to jazz icons Pat Metheny, Miles Davis and others.—GM