With his fourth studio set, Fatboy Slim eschews the smaller beats of his last album, "Halfway Between the Gutter and the Stars" (2000), for the bigger beats of his 6-year-old debut, "You've Come a Lon

With his fourth studio set, Fatboy Slim eschews the smaller beats of his last album, "Halfway Between the Gutter and the Stars" (2000), for the bigger beats of his 6-year-old debut, "You've Come a Long Way, Baby"—albeit with more live musicianship (new British band Jonny Quality, Justin Robertson, Slim himself). Sure, "Palookaville" is a return to form for Slim. His wilder side is very much intact, and songs like "Slash Dot Dash," "Mi Bebé Masoquista" and "Jin Go Lo Ba" find him still partying like it's 1999. But much of "Palookaville" showcases an older and musically wiser Slim. "Don't Let the Man Get You Down," which samples "Signs" by 5 Man Electric Band, is a mantra in need of a real song, while a cover of Steve Miller's "The Joker" (with longtime collaborator Bootsy Collins) is silly. Still, there is gold to be found: the lazy "North West Three," the punky "Push and Shove" (with vocals by Robertson) and the hazy "Put It Back Together" (featuring Damon Albarn). The bouncy "Wonderful Night," which spotlights the vocal stylings of Lateef from Latyrx and DJ Shadow's Quannum Collective, is a single in waiting. Ultimately, "Palookaville" is halfway between a fraternity kegger and a housewarming party.—MP