Tangled Web: A weekly column featuring intriguing online music-related issues & destinations. This Week: Pavement/Matador, Rock.com and Digitalmix.com.

A VISIT WITH 'MY FRIENDS': Pavement fans unsure of the value of today's (Oct. 26) expanded re-release of "Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain" should head over to Matador Records' Web site for a preview taste. The label's Music page is presenting a free MP3 download of the previously unreleased cut "All My Friends," which appears on the new version of the album.

Other friendly items the label has on offer include a track from the Prosaics' "Aghast Agape," due for release Nov. 8 on Matador Europe, and cuts from recent releases by Guided By Voices and A.C. Newman of the New Pornographers.

Matador also has video clips in Real and WindowsMedia formats from the likes of Interpol, Pretty Girls Make Graves, Preston School Of Industry and the aforementioned New Pornographers.

BRINGING THE ROCK: Besides the owner of a surely coveted domain name, Rock.com is the home of dozens of free Internet radio streams as well as videos, music news, artist interviews and a CD store.

The multi-purpose site programs its own commercial-free Web radio channels, style/genre-based with titles like Modern Rock, Extremely New Rock, Heavy Metal Pop, Reggae, Trance and Jazz. It has deals with the five major labels Site CEO Steve Newman says the channels broadcast nearly 3 million tracks per month, and not just the "singles."

"We never forget the best tracks of the artists we play; you won't hear the same four or five tracks that you usually get from traditional radio," Newman says in a statement.

The site also features exclusive Q&As with artists ranging from Mick Fleetwood to Suzanne Vega to Sonic Youth to Hoobastank.

LICENSING IN THE MIX: Vincent Castellucci, a former executive at music publisher Harry Fox Agency, has started a new Web site, Digitalmix.com, intended to serve as a handy source for licensing music by commercially released artists, for use in other media.

The site allows users to search by genre, sub-genre, tempo, predominant instrument, type of song (instrumental or otherwise), artist name and even mood. The latter includes such descriptors as "aggressive," "determined," "devilish," "inner journey," "tender" and "sophisticated."

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

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