Like its 1998 album "Psyence Fiction," UNKLE's "Never, Never, Land" is dark, cold and littered with celebrities. Both sets are largely manned by Mo' Wax label leader James Lavelle. And this is where t

Like its 1998 album "Psyence Fiction," UNKLE's "Never, Never, Land" is dark, cold and littered with celebrities. Both sets are largely manned by Mo' Wax label leader James Lavelle. And this is where the similarities between the two discs end. This lackluster collaboration operates under Lavelle and Richard File, sans DJ Shadow and such dotted dramatis personae as Josh Homme and Ian Brown. Consisting mostly of anthemic house blends and deadpan vocalists, "Never, Never, Land" tends more toward the "dance" elements of IDM than the "intelligent," reducing UNKLE's trip-hop origins and innovative beats to overdrawn synth wank-fests. Songs like "What Are You to Me?" are fulfilling dance-pop tracks but lose steam among the monotony. For all the delightful miscellany that was "Psyence Fiction," "Never, Never, Land" is grossly repetitive — which Lavelle, though obviously capable, refuses to transcend.—KH