Bob Dylan's songs may have spoken for a generation in the 1960s, but Dylan says he never saw himself as more than a singer-songwriter.

Bob Dylan's songs may have spoken for a generation in the 1960s, but Dylan says he never saw himself as more than a singer-songwriter.

"'You're the prophet. You're the savior.' I never wanted to be a prophet or a savior," Dylan tells Ed Bradley on CBS' "60 Minutes." Excerpts of Sunday night's (Dec. 5) scheduled broadcast were released in advance by the network.

"Elvis maybe. I could see myself becoming him," Dylan says. "But prophet? No." The idea of such a perception made him feel like an "impostor," he says. "It was like being in an Edgar Allan Poe story and you're just not that person everybody thinks you are, though they call you that all the time."

He added, "If you examine the songs I don't believe you're going find anything in there that says that I'm a spokesman for anybody or anything, really."

One of Dylan's classics, "Like a Rolling Stone," was recently named the top song of all-time by Rolling Stone magazine. But it's an honor Dylan downplays.

"You know, the list, they change names quite frequently, really. I don't pay much attention to that," the 63-year-old singer says. "But it's a pat on the back, Bob," Bradley says. Dylan replies: "This week it is. But you know, who's to say how long that's going to last."

The interview is Dylan's first for television in 19 years, according to "60 Minutes." The artist recently published his first memoir, "Chronicles: Volume One" (Simon & Schuster).


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