After entering at No. 2 a week ago, Steve Brookstein found his version of Phil Collins' "Against All Odds" (Syco Music) climbing to the top of the U.K. singles chart, published yesterday (Jan. 2). Mea

After entering at No. 2 a week ago, Steve Brookstein found his version of Phil Collins' "Against All Odds" (Syco Music) climbing to the top of the U.K. singles chart, published yesterday (Jan. 2). Meanwhile, on an album chart, Green Day's "American Idiot" rose from No. 13 to top the list again in its 15th week. The Reprise album debuted at No. 1 in late September.

Brookstein's track, the first No. 1 of 2005, is a rare example of a record climbing to the top of the British chart. The 35-year-old singer from south London and winner of the recent ITV talent series "The X Factor," announced on Dec. 31 that all sales proceeds would go to the Asian tsunami relief effort.

"Odds" replaced Band Aid 20's "Do They Know It's Christmas" at the summit of the singles chart, but the all-star charity release was nevertheless confirmed by the Official U.K. Charts Company as Britain's best-selling single of 2004, with sales of 1,066,000 copies.

With few new releases, the new singles chart featured many songs enjoying a brief resurgence, most notably "Out Of Touch" (Gusto) by Uniting Nations, which climbed from No. 13 to a new peak of No. 7 in its sixth chart week. The dance track is based around Daryl Hall and John Oates' 1984 U.S. No. 1 of the same name.

There were two modest singles chart entries in the top 40 as Australian rock band Jet's "Get Me Outta Here" (Elektra) bowed at No. 37 and "Sad and Lonely" (679) by Secret Machines debuted at No. 38.

The U.K. album chart featured some eccentric movement caused chiefly by post-Christmas price cuts by the major retailers, giving new chart life to numerous popular albums.

"Hot Fuss" by Las Vegas rock outfit the Killers bolted 24-5 in its 30th chart week, "Who Killed The Zutons" (Deltasonic) by the Liverpool band up 36-6 after 27 weeks on the chart and "Franz Ferdinand" (Domino) rebounded 35-10. Outkast's "Speakerboxx/The Love Below" (Arista) re-entered the chart at No. 8 and Nirvana's "Nevermind" (Geffen) reappeared at No. 19.

Perhaps most surprisingly, Robbie Williams' "Greatest Hits" (Chrysalis), which topped the chart last week, crashed to No. 9. The self-titled Polydor debut from New York alternative band Scissor Sisters rebounded 3-2, nudging ahead of Keane's "Hopes and Fears" (Universal Island) in the last few days of the year to become the U.K.'s best-selling album of 2004.

The final pan-European charts of the year saw Williams retain top spot on the European Top 100 Albums chart and Band Aid 20 at No. 1 on the Eurochart Hot 100 Singles tally.